PEAR TREE LOG

pear tree log: I started this blog to keep my younger son, Jonny, in touch with life in Lincolnshire, while he spent a year working in China. That year turned into five! Now he is home and training to become a physics teacher. This is simply a patchwork quilt of some of the things I enjoy - life in rural Lincolnshire, our animals, friends, architecture, books, the gardens, and things of passing interest.



Wednesday, 15 February 2012

Thatched Mushroom

I have got a busy day ahead of me and probably won't have time to post later, so here is a lovely thatched cottage which we saw yesterday.  One of the little treasures of Lincolnshire.

16 comments:

  1. Oh how sweet!! No wonder you are so proud of your part of the world with such gems!

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    1. Hi Green Dragonette, It really is very cute. We only came across it the other day - amazing considering it is less than 5 miles away (as the crow flies!) we'll definitely return and photograph it on a better day.

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  2. The cottage looks very snug and warm with its pouffy hat.

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    1. Hi Jenny, It looks even better in real life. I only had time to snatch a quick snap - I'll revisit soon. It does look sweet, especially with that thatch.

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  3. Oh, Elaine, if you keep posting these wonderful photos, I may have to purchase a ticket and fly over. I drool with each glimpse of your life. The photo today, looks magical. But, alas, the Scotland trip comes first to visit with all the "Mac's"

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    1. Hi Meggie, I am so pleased that you enjoyed seeing the cottage. We were out on a mission and found this as an unexpected bonus!

      With all your family connections to Scotland it will be a wonderful when you fly over there and do a grand tour! Scotland is very beautiful - we spent 3 years living in the Western Isles of Scotland and seriously considered retiring back there!

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  4. My grandmother lived in a thatched cottage..I remember hearing mice scurrying in the thatch.
    Jane x

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    1. Hi Jane, Ha-ha, that reminds me of when we lived in Scotland, we had 3 cats who were supposed to hunt and keep us rodent free. One night I awoke and felt a fairly heavy weight on my feet, I drowsily decided that it must be one of the cats - put on the bedside light, the weight moved -very quickly, it was a rat!! No thatch was involved, it was a tiled roof. Those critters get everywhere!

      PS The cats got a very severe talking-to and the rat was caught the following day!

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  5. You've transported me to Hobbiton. What a delightful little house.

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    1. Hi Doohie, Isn't it a charming little place. Definitely Hobbiton, and definitely a cottage we shall revisit to take some better photographs.

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  6. Beautiful, charming, and magical!

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    1. Hi Mitch, It was magical the way it suddenly appeared - we turned a corner on a quiet road, and hey presto! Unfortunately I was ill prepared and hadn't got my wellington boots with me, nor had we much spare time, otherwise I would have been snapping away from every angle! All in the lines of blogging duty, of course.

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  7. I fell in love with thatched roof cottages as a child visiting England. I still love them and this is one of the cutest ever!

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    1. Hi Natalie, It is so very cute in real life - the sort you could easily make up a story about. Right opposite it is a bright red, old fashioned telephone box, it all looks very quaint.

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  8. I read once that mice (and other interesting characters) inhabiting thatched roofs (rooves?)were the reason for the canopy on beds. It kept the fallout off you while you were sleeping. Does someone live in the charming little cottage? I'd love to see what the inside is like!

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  9. Hi Ms Sparrow, It is a lovely idea about the beds, but the people who could have afforded a canopied bed (or, indeed, a bed) would also have had a plastered ceiling to stop the fallout. The peasants could only afford straw pallets on the floor and had to put up with whatever fell their way.

    The little cottage does look lived in - I plan to go that way again in a couple of months, if I have the opportunity I will take more photographs - I'd loved to see the interior too!

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