PEAR TREE LOG

pear tree log: I started this blog to keep my younger son, Jonny, in touch with life in Lincolnshire, while he spent a year working in China. That year turned into five! Now he is home and training to become a physics teacher. This is simply a patchwork quilt of some of the things I enjoy - life in rural Lincolnshire, our animals, friends, architecture, books, the gardens, and things of passing interest.



Tuesday, 6 March 2012

Life in Rural Lincolnshire

I hold my hand up right now and declare that I do not support fox hunting, however, I do love the spectacle of the horses, hounds and the hunting pink jackets.   


This post is not about the rights or wrongs of hunting, nor is it about the problems caused by foxes,  I am simply reporting on my day.


I spent a couple of hours digging another vegetable bed - one whole one!  So that is three done, so far.    By then it was time for our lunch and a welcome break.
I became aware that I could hear horses so I nipped out to the front, to be greeted by this sight.  Disappearing into the distance was the hunt.  I watched them go with mixed feelings - wishing the foxes well, and the horses and hounds a safe return. 
I resumed my digging and some time later these two stragglers came, separately, into the barley field.  The darker one seemed happy to amble around sniffing here and there, the other one was desperate to find his way back to the pack - long since gone.
The hunt clattered back down our road, disrupting the postman's round and causing havoc with the tractors which frequent the narrow road.
I heaved a huge sigh of relief as I had been waiting for them to go away so that I could walk up the road to visit Arnold - Toby would have had a fit of the vapours if he'd been faced with meeting so many strange dogs.
However, the hunt hadn't finished as they came back through and gathered at the old railway bridge while someone was dispatched to find the stragglers.  I wonder if they lose many hounds that way.
I took the opportunity to walk the couple of hundred yards up the road to visit the old horse, Arnold. He was a little distracted as he kept listening out for horses and hounds, but he was more than happy to have a hug and some treats.   
While I was with him I spotted these hens - I think one of the stragglers must have scared them up onto their hen house roof because I haven't seen them up there before.
On the way home I was fortunate to find a little patch of white violets.

28 comments:

  1. Now I support the hunt but would fear for my welsh terriers if ever the hunt turned up here ( WELSH TERRIERS LOOK LIKE FOXES!)

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    1. Welsh Terriers look like big cuddly teddy bears!

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  2. Keeping my trap shut about anything hunt related!!
    Jane x

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    1. Absolutely! Reporting my day is not supporting the hunt.

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  3. So the hunters just run roughshod over the countryside? That seems awfully rude. I would be rooting for the fox! I'm so glad the "girls" escaped to the top of the hen house. It would be awful if they got lost in the commotion.

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    1. That is about it, Ms Sparrow. It is awfully rude and I do root for the fox. Of course these days they don't really hunt for foxes, it's just that they do occasionally accidentally kill one... Believe that if you will!

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  4. I won't pretend I know anything about the fox and the hounds, but I have learned a lot as a city girl living the country life. When I first moved out here, I thought I might need to strap my pistol in a holster at my side. I truly didn't know what to expect. What we have are coyotes, that come mainly at night to attack animals. Once, I came face to face with two of them in my pasture....I ran back to the barn as fast as I could. I have been close enough to point my gun at one while he was trying to attack a baby calf. Fortunately, he backed away. Gosh....that sounds like something out of an old wild west movie!

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    1. Somehow, Meggie, I can quite imagine you doing the necessary to defend the animals - as would I. One of the things which attracted me to your blog was the hint of the old wild west in the title! The only coyote I have seen was a character in a cartoon, many years ago. \i'll settle for foxes.

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  5. I thought real foxes were banned in Britain. Or am I fantasizing. That makes it even worse than just commandeering the road right of way. And fields. And losing dogs, who look pretty good natured, but nevertheless...

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    1. The hunt is not supposed to kill foxes... but oddly enough they go to places where I know there are foxholes. They do tend to commandeer country roads to get where they want to go, but I think they ask permission of the farmers to ride along their tracks and across their land. Thank goodness they don't come here more than once a year.

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  6. And here I am wishing I was younger (much younger)and riding that hunt (for the thrill of the ride not the hunt or the harm of the fox).

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    1. No harm in following a dragged scent, they could do that and still have a wonderful time. You'd enjoy it Janet. By the way, you are a young 'un compared to a number of the riders.

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  7. ...and yet you missed the best bit, ten minutes before any riders appeared, where a dozen and more totally unsupervised hounds flooded through Davina's place, in and out of your fruit garden, back and forth through your hedges and fences, looking for something small to chase and kill...

    Glad that Toby was indoors, your cats were safe and that the hens had somewhere to leap to; no doubt the dogs flooded through the owl wood too.

    So nice and responsible of the hunt to let the pack loose through the village without any warning or supervision.

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    1. Owl, I did say that it was an account of MY day. I neither saw nor heard what you did. I have since re-played the recording on the security camera.

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  8. I'm definately anti-hunt even though I keep hens and risk loosing them to foxes.

    Although I recognise the need for control of some species, the ritualistic slaughter of a fox for sport by members of the 'upper classes' (for want of a better phrase) for fun turns my stomach.

    Plenty of murderers, thieves and tories to chase. Why not let 'em out on day release, smeared in Pedigree Chum, and give 'em a five minute head start!

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    1. Hear, hear. There are a few more I could add to that list, but that will do for starters! I simply wanted to share an unusual day.

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  9. Beautiful images. Too bad about the reality. Like bullfighting. Hope they were out-foxed!

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    1. I sincerely hope so too, Mitch. They look spectacular and the horses are amazing but it is barbaric.

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  10. I'd better join Jane and keep quiet otherwise I'll go on a rant.
    Cruel, arrogant, obnoxious - - - ooops I'm supposed to be keeping quiet.
    I'm glad you were able to go see Arnold and give him a treat.

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    1. Arnold is a wonderful old horse!

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  11. I'm glad I am down in London today and that they don't come through Belleau as I know The Viking would go purple with anger!... I am actually proud to say I think that the horse-riding fox hunters are disgusting people... and should the roles ever be reversed...

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    1. Join the queue Dom. I love the way you are promoting good old Lincolnshire Poacher cheese. I wonder what type of scones will be called for in the Village Show this year... x

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  12. Have to say when my parents had their farm the pressure put upon them to allow the hunt to cross their land was enormous-basically they were told that if they didn’t allow it they would be ‘shunned’ by influential members in the community...one day some of the hounds did run rampage through the village and killed two pet rabbits in a run in sight of the nine year old child who owned them. The utter arrogance and insensitivity shown by the ‘master’ of the hunt to the family was appalling...

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    1. Hi Green Dragonette, I rather think that the threat of being shunned, would be a red rag to a bull, for me. I would definitely not have let them across my land! Luckily we don't have enough land for them to be interested, but they are a nuisance - and yes, they can be extremely arrogant and insensitive.

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  13. Elaine - you've taken some great pictures. Looks as if your hens are hedging their bets up there on the roof. Those little white violets are gorgeous. I haven't discovered any violets out here yet.

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    1. Hi Molly, I was delighted to find that little clump of white violets, I keep looking out for regular ones but I haven't found any yet. What a job - but someone has to do it!

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  14. Now thats something you would never see here as we have no foxes, supposedly! Although there have been rumours that one or two have been smuggled onto the island.

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    1. It is a lovely spectacle, but a cruel 'sport'. Horses and riders are always immaculately turned out, well they start out that way!

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