PEAR TREE LOG

pear tree log: I started this blog to keep my younger son, Jonny, in touch with life in Lincolnshire, while he spent a year working in China. That year turned into five! Now he is home and training to become a physics teacher. This is simply a patchwork quilt of some of the things I enjoy - life in rural Lincolnshire, our animals, friends, architecture, books, the gardens, and things of passing interest.



Thursday, 24 May 2012

Can Anyone Identify This Butterfly?

George found this little beauty in the poly tunnel - it measured approximately two inches across.

26 comments:

  1. Beautiful but I've never seen it before. Have a nice time.

    Hugs
    Elna

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  2. Not a clue, but I chased a very similar (and similarly unusual) one down the lane a couple of days ago. The one I saw was more white/cream and just had faded orange/tangerine wing-tips. It was unusual enough for me to keep trying to catch it up for a closer look! Maybe a new Lincolnshire species?

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    1. It is a little beauty, no wonder George grabbed the camera. I'm sure I haven't seen one before, but I'll watch out for them now.

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  3. His name is Bert and he's a real sweetie

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    1. I just checked - you're right!

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  4. No help here either, but very pretty x

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    1. Hello Cheryl, It is lovely, I'm so glad he spotted it.

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  5. I think it's an orange tip xx

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    1. Hello Mrs Thrifty, A great big thank you for that. It is such an appropriate name; not one I will easily forget!x

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  6. I was told long ago that butterflys rest with closed wings and moths with open. I was also told it's more complex than that and involves counting feet and stuff like that.

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    1. Hello Joanne, That is interesting ... counting feet sounds like I would have to get a bit too close for comfort, though!

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  7. Hello Elaine....not for sure, but may be an Orange Tip - Anthocharis Cardamines....

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    1. Hello Meggie, Orange Tip so perfectly describes it. Thank you!

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  8. It does appear to be the Orange Tip - Anthocharis Cardamines. I found it in our European field guide and online (many times). Here's a link: http://www.butterfly-guide.co.uk/species/whites/welc1.htm

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    1. Hello Mitch, Thank you! I'll check that link out shortly. I can be sure I will remember a name like that!

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  9. Hi Elaine--it's unanimous...it's an Orange Tip! How amazing it chose your home to visit.

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    1. Hello Susan, An Orange Tip...such a beauty. We haven't seen one before so it was very exciting.

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  10. Well, congratulations on being the first in your neighborhood to have an Orange Tip Butterfly!

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    1. Hello Ms Sparrow, I have just been reading a little about the Orange Tip and it is found on woodland edges/hedgerows - so it got that right - with just a little diversion into the polytunnel!

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  11. Well, now that it's been identified, all I can say is "pretty butterfly." I did enjoy the mystery.

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    1. Hello Janet, We have lots of the types of flowers it needs so we may see more of them, although they are cannibalistic...

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  12. Hello Jim, Thank you! I think you may have been looking for my Friday's Fences and just beat me by a click! Thanks for stopping by.

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  13. Pleased someone knew the name of the butterfly. I have never seen anything like it in Ohio, USA. Butterflies are favorites of mine.

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    1. Hello Pauline, It is such a pretty little thing. I have been working outside in the garden for the last six hours, in the hope of seeing one - no such luck - but I'll keep watching!

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